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Why Won’t These Kids Listen?

Discipline / Leadership / Teaching Techniques //

Anyone who has taught kids knows how hard it can be to help them transition to a time of learning. Whether they’re returning from recess or PE, bouncing after a rowdy worship session, or just plain excited because it’s snowing outside, kids sometimes need help settling down!

About 10 years ago, I had a class of ALL boys…the energy level was high almost all of the time, and transitions were particularly difficult. This was a self-contained class for kids with special needs, and at least half of my students struggled with maintaining attention. I often felt that I spent the majority of the day directing them (okay, nagging and pleading…) to settle down so that we could get some work done. I used to periodically tape-record our class so I could listen to my interactions with the kids and analyze my teaching.** When I listened to those tapes, I was appalled at how much “nagging” I was doing. No wonder the boys were tuning me out!

During that same year, I became interested in football. The Washington Redskins  were doing quite well, and I got caught up in the excitement. My husband and I, along with our friends, spent Sunday afternoons in front of the TV during game time. I didn’t know a lot about football, so I spent a good deal of time whispering, “What’s that signal for?” or “Why did the ref do that?” My newfound love of football gave me the opportunity to bond with the boys in my classroom, too, as most of them were fans. Many of our math problems and bonus spelling words revolved around the Redskins that year!

I wondered if, somehow, football might be able to help us with our transition problems. As football season continued, I had become quite savvy with the football signals, and took great pride in learning the meaning of even the most obscure motions. One day after the boys returned from recess in super-high-energy mode, I decided to give it a try. Instead of nagging or yelling for them to sit down, I stood silently at the front of the room and began going through some of the football signals. One by one, they noticed what I was doing and began piping up, “Safety! Holding! Touchdown!” This activity became a great transition tool. The students learned that when I started doing football signals, I needed their attention: eyes up front, bodies seated and ready to learn. For this group of kids, it was effective–and fun! (much better than nagging…)

TOUCHDOWN!
~Katie

Tell me what transition strategies work for your class!

** If you plan to tape record a class you are teaching, please consult with your organization’s legal  or leadership team to be certain that you are following policies that are respectful, with the primary goal of protecting students.

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About the Author

Katie Wetherbee completed her undergraduate work at Vanderbilt University, where she majored in Special Education and Human & Organizational Development. Katie began her teaching career in the Washington, DC area at a public school. Since then, she has taught in a variety of settings, including a community college, a psychiatric hospital day school and a learning center. Katie holds a master’s degree in education from Hood College, where she served on the adjunct faculty for the Reading Specialist program. Currently, Katie works as an educational consultant in private practice. Her own experience as a mother to a child with special needs, along with her teaching background, gives Katie a unique perspective on advocacy. She has been invited to speak at local parent groups and also for the Northern Ohio Hemophilia Association, the Cancer Survivor Center at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital and the OCALI national conference. Additionally, Katie is a freelance writer whose articles have appeared in publications such as Nashville Magazine, Northeast Ohio Family, and HeartShapers. She served as the education columnist for Currents News in Northeast Ohio for two years. She recently completed a year-long series on special needs ministry for K! Magazine and also writes a column for Children’s Ministry Magazine. A lifelong Christian, Katie has enjoyed a variety of volunteer positions in churches. She has taught both Sunday School and Vacation Bible School as well as volunteering in high school and middle school youth groups. She and her husband led a Young Couples group in two churches. In addition, Katie has served on Christian Education Committees and as a Sunday School Superintendent. Katie is thrilled to combine her passion for families affected by disabilities with her faith in Christ. Katie has presented at the Joni and Friends International Bioethics Conference, the Accessibility Summit at McLean Bible Church, The Tough Ministries Conference in Houston, and the Group Publishing KidMin Conference. She is currently working on a book designed for Sunday School volunteers, and also serves on the special needs curriculum team for Standard Publishing. Katie’s most important credential is her “MBA:” She is MOM to Bill and Annie. Katie and her husband, Tom, live with their two teenagers and a quirky mutt named Mitzie, in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. Why “Diving for Pearls?” Click here for the story.